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Congress Schedule (as of October 3, 2013)

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Securing a Sustainable Energy Future

Energizing Social Innovation This session examines the challenges and efforts to deal with energy issues and
the importance of increased responsibility to resolve them.

Daily Theme, time&program
Time Program Day/Full Program Day / Full ProgramSee Details See Details
08:50-09:00
Scene Setting

Convention Hall, 5th Floor, EXCO

09:00-09:50
10:00-11:15
Opening

Sustainable energy for all: One year later close button

Convention Hall, 5th Floor, EXCO

Energy is the golden thread that runs through all pillars of sustainable development. The UN Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) initiative seeks to achieve, by 2030, three objectives: 1) universal access to modern energy services, 2) double the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix, and 3) double the global rate of improvement of energy efficiency. Driving actions and mobilizing commitments to transform the world's energy systems are essential to achieving these goals.

Questions

  • 1) What has 2012 the UN year of sustainable energy for all achieved and what is the way forward?
  • 2) How can progress be tracked and incentivized?
  • 3) What are the missing pieces to ensure that objectives will be delivered?
  • 4) What should be the role of WEC and its members?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

11:15-11:45
Networking Break
11:45-13:00
Game Changer

Smart grid: Energizing social innovation close button

Room 324, 3rd Floor, EXCO

By enabling energy efficiency, integrating renewable energy, supporting electric vehicle deployment, reducing CO2 emissions, and a more interactive participation of consumers, smart grids could become the backbone for tomorrow’s energy solutions. The momentum is building globally, but unfortunately today most smart grid business cases are weak as we overestimate the customer engagement and grossly underestimate the cost and benefits.

Questions

  • 1) What are the success stories of incentivizing demand?
  • 2) Will demand follow? Are people buying into the smart revolution?
  • 3) Is it a business case? Who should pay?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

Bottom Line

Energy efficiency: How to fulfil the potential close button

Auditorium, 5th Floor, EXCO

It is widely recognized that the potential in energy efficiency is massive. Yet progress is slow. Simply economics or other implementation barriers such as the availability of capital, technological uncertainties, changes in energy subsidies and policy distortions, lack of international standards and the sheer complexity of consumer behaviour, are acting as stumbling blocks to convert intent into action. It takes a collective effort and leadership at all levels.

Questions

  • 1) What are inspiring success stories in the developing world?
  • 2) What are the critical success factors?
  • 3) From policy to behavior: Epidemiology - Can learning from other disciplines (e.g. health) deliver insights to guide an energy epidemiology approach?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

What Does It Take?

Energy access: Steps to progress close button

Convention Hall, 5th Floor, EXCO

About 1.2 billion people do not have access to electricity, 89% of which live in rural areas. 2.8 billion people do not have access to clean cooking facilities - breathing in toxic smoke that causes lung disease and kills nearly 2 million people a year, most of them women and children. There is no lack of good intention. Unfortunately, however, the situation is expected to change little by 2030 unless more positive action is taken.

Questions

  • 1) Are we actually making progress?
  • 2) What are the success stories and what does it take to take them to scale?
  • 3) What are the missing ingredients?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

What Does It Take?

Renewables: Making the business case for distributed energy close button

Room 322, 3rd Floor, EXCO

Renewable energy is not only a solution for ensuring energy security and conserving the environment, but in many countries it is often the best solution for distributed energy and provides an engine for local development and poverty reduction through new green jobs. Countries that have been fastest to embrace the green economy have already created millions of green jobs and new economic growth engines that are not dependent on fossil fuels or scarce natural resources.

Questions

  • 1) What are the success stories and why did they work?
  • 2) Will distributed energy actually create jobs?
  • 3) Is it an inclusive green growth agenda?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

Regional Crossroads

An energy infrastructure road map for Africa close button

Room 321, 3rd Floor, EXCO

The Sub-Saharan Africa is well endowed both with fossil fuels and renewable resources. However, most of this potential remains untapped as countries face institutional and infrastructural barriers to make efficient use of it. The region’s limited ability to improve its energy system and related services has significant repercussions on its social and economic development, including poor quality of life and low standards in health, education and economic competitiveness.

Questions

  • 1) What can lead to faster development in this region?
  • 2) What breakthrough solutions can be expected from related sectors?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

13:00-14:15
Luncheon
14:15-15:30
Game Changer

Creating Utilities 2.0: New business models for smart energy close button

Auditorium, 5th Floor, EXCO

The threat to the centralized utility model is likely to come from new technologies and customer behavioral changes. A decentralized energy system is able to allow for putting power sources closer to the consumer, more optimal use of renewables, and increasing eco-efficiency. The prospect of a more distributed utilities network offers promise on many levels - economic, environmental, technological and sociological. However, it is still a relatively new business.

Questions

  • 1) Can old utilities cope with new decentralized energy?
  • 2) What are the new models that can?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

Bottom Line

Waste to energy: Valuing the dirty job close button

Room 321, 3rd Floor, EXCO

Waste is not only dirty, but its management is awash with archaic regulations, corruption, a lack of transparency and misguided perceptions. The paradox is that waste also has the potential to be the most sustainable resource. Waste only really becomes waste when we bury it in the ground. The average individual generates about 4.4 pounds of waste per day. We have to think about waste as a resource: waste of one system becomes the input for another.

Questions

  • 1) Is it local or national governments who need to be more prescriptive to promote waste to energy?
  • 2) Is it a perception problem?
  • 3) Is the technology mature and cheap enough to do a green job?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

What Does It Take?

Mega projects: Socio-environmental license to operate close button

Room 324, 3rd Floor, EXCO

Grass roots resistance can often impact and delay works in transmission lines, hydro projects, oil platforms, wind farms and mining projects. Such mega projects must meet the escalating external demands for sustainability issues including environment, safety, risk management, social responsibility, and governance. This comes back to the fundamental acceptance of the need for the project, and the trust to carry it out in a responsible way.

Questions

  • 1) What are successful examples of stakeholder engagement with mega projects?
  • 2) What ownership models help to gain trust and local buy-in?
  • 3) Are there any gaps to be closed when it comes to safety standards and what are good examples when it comes to improving safety standards, including international collaboration, partnerships, etc.?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

15:30-16:00
Networking Break
16:00-17:15
Closing

Today’s energy: Are we at a tipping point? – Redefining resilience close button

Convention Hall, 5th Floor, EXCO

The picture of today’s energy has dramatically changed and energy has become extremely complex. Just a few years ago, the only uncertainty in energy was the price of oil. Now there are so many issues including a delinking of oil and gas prices, huge dynamism in the renewables, uncertainty in the CO2 price and energy-water-food nexus, and the integration of China and India into international energy institutions. The energy scene is at a critical stage of development and decision-making.

Questions

  • 1) What are the influencers of the energy future and are thus contributors to the tipping point?
  • 2) What key actions are needed to advance tomorrow’s energy?

Discussion Leaders

Moderator

17:30-18:30
Closing

Closing Ceremony (5F Convention Hall, EXCO) close button

The highlights of WEC Daegu 2013 will be shown at the ceremony. This will be a priceless opportunity to sum up valuable speeches presented by the world’s prominent energy leaders. The delegates at WEC Daegu 2013 will share the valuable fruits of dedicated discussions at Congress.

19:00-21:00

Farewell Reception (B1 Grand Ballroom, Hotel Inter-Burgo EXCO) close button

The Farewell Reception will celebrate with every delegate on the successful outcome of WEC Daegu 2013 and prepare for reunion meetings at WEC 2016. This event will be a bridge to the next congress and the delegates will have the opportunity to build up their solid networking.